Explore ancient civilizations (and their diseases) in this delightful coloring book

A coloring book starring prehistoric tooth extractions, plague rats, and ancient colon contents could be just the right stress reliever for this holiday season. Coloring books are supposed to be soothing — but this one is also scientifically accurate.

Called Adventures in Archaeological Science,” the 12-page book delves into what microbial archaeologist Christina Warinner calls the “archaeology of the invisible”. Warinner, the book’s editor, investigates how tiny microbes like bacteria have shaped human health over time. She studies the gunk still caught between the teeth left in human skulls, ancient poop, and the leftover streaks of food still coating prehistoric pots. So you’ll find a gap-toothed skull and plenty of bacteria, like…

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Author: Rachel Becker

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Meet the unfortunate DJ who shares a name with the FCC’s Ajit Pai

About two months ago, Ajit Pai, a 42-year-old DJ in Goa, India, noticed a puzzling comment on his Instagram. It was abusive, but without any clear reason. The next day, more strange comments began to appear on his account. Some included the hashtag #netneutrality. Finally, it clicked. They were looking for Federal Communications Commission chairman Ajit Pai.

Pai first learned that he shared a name with the chairman six months ago, but it had never been a problem until that comment. Last week, as the FCC vote to remove established net neutrality rules became a national controversy, Pai suddenly found himself at the center of the public’s rage about losing access to an unregulated internet.

“I’ve been getting death [threats] and abusive…

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Author: Megan Farokhmanesh

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The Elecjet AnyWatt is a great but sketchy USB-C MacBook dongle

Dongles are, as a general rule, terrible. Using them is bad, losing them is bad, from a design perspective they look bad — even the word “dongle” just sounds bad.

But for the past few weeks, I’ve been trying out Elecjet’s AnyWatt dongle — and it might just be good.

What is it?

The AnyWatt was a Kickstarter from earlier this year, but it’s actually shipping now for anyone who missed the campaign. It’s a dongle, designed (like many dongles are) for users who have made the jump to a USB-C device but still want to use their old cables. But the Anywatt isn’t for USB cables — it converts older laptop chargers into a spare charger for your newer devices.

The final version is a little more streamlined than the original, chunkier plastic one…

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Author: Chaim Gartenberg

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Tesla is prohibiting commercial drivers from using its Supercharger stations

If you use your Tesla for your job, you won’t be able to use the company’s Supercharger stations anymore. The company recently released a new policy called Supercharger Fair Use, which prohibits commercial drivers from using the red-and-white charging ports.

Tesla has been working to expand its network of charging stations, announcing in April that it hoped to have more than 10,000 Supercharger stations by the end of 2017. The expansion is needed to alleviate heavy traffic at the stations, which have become a congestion point for drivers. Last year, the company announced fees for charging, and said that it will begin charging drivers an additional fee if they leave their cars at the stations after they’ve finished charging.

Tesla says…

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Author: Andrew Liptak

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Read an excerpt from Eliot Peper’s new science fiction thriller, Bandwidth

A couple of years ago, I read Cumulus, a self-published book by Eliot Peper. The novel follows three characters in a near-future San Francisco, which is divided into a super-wealthy tech elite and the downtrodden customers who use their services. It’s an engaging satire of Silicon Valley, and it put Peper on my radar.

In May, Peper will publish his second book, called Bandwidth. It’s about a near-future Mexico City lawyer named Dag Calhoun, who begins to question the world he’s making by representing high-powered tech and energy executives. When he’s almost killed in a drive-by shooting, he discovers that a group of activists have been hijacking digital feeds to manipulate public opinion and global markets, and revealing their existence…

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Author: Andrew Liptak

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The composer behind the original Mega Man just released an incredible solo album

Manami Matsumae is most closely associated with a tiny blue robot. The Tokyo-based composer is best known for her work on the Mega Man series, having crafted the sound of the Blue Bomber’s original outing, and later contributing tracks to games like Mega Man 10 and the ill-fated spiritual successor Mighty No. 9. Now, after a career that has spanned three decades and dozens of games, she’s finally releasing her first solo album called Three Movements. And while it may not be associated with any specific game, the album is structured like a tour through the history of video game music.

Three Movements starts out with the kinds of tracks you’d expect from Matsumae. The opening is a trio of bubbly chiptune songs that sound like they’re…

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Author: Andrew Webster

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