Before Playing Stadia, Google Has Some Suggestions

Google Stadia officially launches tomorrow–at least for the people who were the quickest to order–and in preparation for the big day the company has outlined some tips to get the most out of your Stadia experience. Some of the tips distributed to pre-purchasers through email are good common tech-savvy sense, while others may be a bit harder to swallow.

The most difficult suggestion is the final one: “For the best performance, don’t stream movies or music to other devices in other parts of the house while playing games on Stadia. It can slow things down.” Naturally, that’s more of a suggestion than a requirement, but telling your family or roommates to stop binging Netflix for a couple hours so you can play Stadia is probably going to be a tough sell.

Other tips include how to make sure the included Google Chromecast works ideally. Google recommends connecting it with an Ethernet cable, or failing that, at least setting them up in the same room, at least one foot apart. It also suggests using a 5Ghz network on your wifi router, if you have that option. Plus, make sure to set up the Stadia controller, Chromecast Ultra, and any other devices you want to use (like your laptop or phone) on the same network.

Google recommends making sure your TV is set to Game Mode and Ultra High Definition (UHD) if available. And download the Google Home App on your mobile device, since it will be required to set up your Chromecast.

Google’s Tips For The Best Stadia Experience

  • Don’t stream movies or music while playing Stadia
  • Connect your Google Chromecast to an Ethernet cable, or,
  • If using a wifi router, set it up in the same room as your Chromecast
  • Use the 5Ghz setting on your wifi router
  • Set up Stadia controller, Chromecast Ultra, and any other devices on the saame network
  • Set your TV to Game Mode and Ultra High Definition (UHD) mode
  • Download the Google Home App on your mobile device for setup

Google Stadia is launching with a bigger launch library than previously announced, but it’s missing some key features that are supposed to help set the platform apart.

“So far, Google’s tech has impressed me to the point where I would comfortably play most in a browser tab or on a phone without batting an eye, but then I consider that I will have to buy the vast majority of games, and I’m left in awe of the value Microsoft and Sony are offering, even if their overall services lack Stadia’s flexibility,” Peter Brown wrote in GameSpot’s review-in-progress. “For the moment, cloud gaming still feels like a decent alternative to the real thing, and I don’t think I’m ready to dedicate a full-price game purchase to a secondary platform.”

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Author: Steve Watts