Social networks have been weaponized for the impeachment hearings

Ambassador William Taylor, right, speaks, along with Deputy Assistant Secretary George Kent appear during an impeachment inquiry in Washington, D.C. on November 13Ambassador William Taylor, right, speaks, along with Deputy Assistant Secretary George Kent appear during an impeachment inquiry in Washington, D.C. on November 13 | Photo by Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Interface will be off next week as Zoe and I wrap up a couple big reports we’ve been working on for a while now. I’ll be interviewing Tristan Harris on stage Monday at the Techonomy conference in Half Moon Bay — if you’re in attendance, say hi! Later in the week, I’ll be speaking at Tufts University’s inaugural conference on New Media and Democracy. See you on the 25th.

Impeachment hearings got underway in the House of Representatives this week, as you likely noticed from the wall-to-wall coverage. The process involves the sort of high-stakes, highly partisan events that naturally dominate social feeds. What television was to impeachment in the 1970s and 1990s, Facebook and Twitter — and YouTube and maybe TikTok — will be to…

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Author: Casey Newton